How to start your journey into Microservices Part -2

In the last blog we learned that there are various areas of designing microservices.

In this blog we will work on decomposition of a larger problem into smaller microservices and look at the subtle but very important aspects on why to breakup and how simple it could be.

For this we will be using DDD. We will not go in detail of what exactly is ddd , we will work on the strategic design part of DDD, but lets still iterate over some of the principles of DDD.

One principle behind DDD is to bridge the gap between domain experts and developers by using the same language to create the same understanding. You must have seen cases where it becomes difficult for the product managers / experts to iteratively add features as the language between the pm and dev is different.

Another principle is to reduce complexity by applying object oriented design and design patters to avoid reinventing the wheel.

But what is a Domain? A Domain is a “sphere of knowledge”, for instance the business the company runs. A Domain is also called a “problem space”, so the problem for which we have to design a solution.

Lets choose a business problem like building a E-Commerce site<Amazon> on which we will try to apply DDD. We will not be able to go in complete depth of the business problem. I am writing very basic features required for it to work:

  1. User searches for a product
  2. User place a order for that product
  3. User pays online
  4. Delivery Management processes that order and start the delivery
  5. Delivery update the Order Status

Now we will try to design this in traditional way, lets create the schema:

  • Tables
    • Product
      • id
      • name
      • image url
      • price
      • count available
      • ….
    • Product Packaging Info
      • id
      • product id
      • size
      • isFragile
      • …..
    • Order
      • product id
      • user id
      • delivery address details
      • paid
    • Order Delivery Status
      • id
      • order id
      • delivery company name
      • delivery company id
      • delivery company code
    • Delivery Company
      • id
      • name
      • ….
    • User
      • id
      • name
      • address details
    • User Preferences
      • id
      • name
      • preferences

We can create a table structure like this in our system<lot more tables will be there>. I think by looking at those tables you could understand not all tables to be understood by every dev, eg: someone working on delivery management might not be interested in UserPreferences <used for searching> and someone working on searching might not be interested in OrderDeliveryStatus.

By this you can understand that we need to break the structure in smaller areas.

To design this in a way which helps to put more business context and smaller structure to manage . Lets put DDD.

As Domain in DDD means we are talking about a specific set of area <knowledge> . In larger sense E-commerce domain can be classified internally by various subdomain like:

  1. Identity Management
    1. User
  2. Inventory Management
    1. Product
  3. Product Search
    1. Product
    2. UserPreferences
  4. Order
    1. Order
    2. Order Delivery Status
  5. Delivery Management
    1. Order
    2. Product Packaging Info
    3. Delivery Company
    4. Order Deliver Status
  6. Billing

The separated Domain can easily be visualized. In DDD terms this is called a Context Map, and it is the starting point for any further modeling.Essentially what we have done is breakup the larger problem into smaller interconnected ones.

Now we need to align the Subdomain aka problem space to our solution design, we need to form a solution space. A solution space in DDD lingo is also called a Bounded Context, and it is the best to align one problem space/Subdomain with one solution space/Bounded Context.

In this we can think of each sub domain as a diff. microservice. Microservices are not complete without their dependencies . lets see them in context of bounded context:

  • Product Search – dependent on – Inventory Management
  • Delivery Management – dependent on – Order
  • Product Search – dependent on – User
  • Billing – dependent on – order
  • … so on

you can see that their is dependency between order and billing service and they talk via a common shared objects model which both of them can represent separately rather that using a single complete model which is cumbersome eg: order object in order service<care about status> is different from order in billing service<care about amount> . Now this is benefit of breaking them into smaller and separated domains.

To define such contracts one can also use ContextMapper.

There are certain outcomes one should take out of this:

  • Breaking into smaller pieces is very important so that it becomes easy for people to work on diff. part of the business
  • It is very simple when we are clear about the business sub domains .

After this i recommend you guys to go in more depth of DDD and look one more example here.

In next we will look about authentication mechanisms.

Tool for debugging Java Stack Traces – Untangle Threads

FastThreadAnalyzer is the tool which helps to debug you java stack traces.

It provides various insights about the stacks , club the similar stack together and provide you direction or in some cases the exact issue.

Some of the screenshots of the tools:

Threads of same thread pool grouped via thread state:

provides a clear view and you can deduce very easily that whether all threads of a particular pool should be busy or not

Now you see these threads group via similar stacks , which provides great insights on what type of flow are stuck:

Overall Thread State Wise Grouping:

Thread Dependencies:

very easily you can see because of which thread ids these threads are blocked.

There are various other type of grouping of stacks as well like based on length of stacks , deadlocks and so on.

If your org works on java that this should be the default tool to debug the application issues.

How to start your journey into Microservices Part -1

Architecting an application using Microservices for the first timers can be very confusing. This article is very relevant if

  • You are you beginning to develop an application that can scale like Amazon, Facebook, Netflix, and Google.
  • You are doing this for the first time.
  • You have already done research and decided that microservices architecture is going to be your secret sauce.

Microservices architecture is believed to be the simplest way of scaling without limits. However, when you get started, a lot of considerations are going to confuse you. Questions arose as I spent time learning about it online or discussing it with a team:

  1. What exactly is a microservice?
    1. Some said it should not exceed 1,000 lines of code.
    2. Some say it should fit one bounded context (if you don’t know what a bounded context is, don’t bother with it right now; keep reading).
  2. Even before deciding on what the “micro”service will be, what exactly is a service?
  3. Microservices do not allow updating multiple entities at once; how will I maintain consistency between entities
  4. Should I have a single database cluster for all my microservices?
  5. What is this eventual consistency thing everyone is talking about?
  6. How will I collate data which is composed of multiple entities residing in different services?
  7. What would happen if one service goes down? How would the dependent services behave?
  8. Should I make a sync invocation between microservices to always get consistent data?
  9. How will I manage version upgrades to a few or all microservices? Is it always possible to do it without downtime?
  10. And the last unavoidable question – how do I test the entire application as an integrated application?

Hmm… All of the above questions must be answered to able to be understand and deploy applications based on microservices.

Lets first list down all things we should cover to understand Microservices :

  • Decomposition – Breaking of system in Microservices and contracts between them
  • Authentication – how authentication info is passed from service to service , how diff. services validate the session
  • Service Discovery – hard coded , external system based like consul , eureka , kubernetes
  • Data Management – Where to store the data , whether to share the DB or not
  • Auditing – very important in business applications to have audit information about who updated or created something
  • Transactional Messaging – when you require very high consistency between DB operation and its event passed onto diff. services
  • Testing – What all to test , Single Service , Cross Service Concerns
  • Deployment Pattern – serverless , docker based
  • Developer Environment Setup – All Services running on developer machine , or single setup
  • Release Upgrades – How to do zero downtime release upgrades , blue green deployments
  • Debugging – Pass tracing id between services , track time taken between services , log aggregation
  • Monitoring – API time taken , System Health Check
  • UI Development – Single Page Applications or Micro Front Ends and client side composition
  • Security – for internal users

The First Thing we should learn is how to Decompose or build the Services:

Domain Driven Design:

While researching the methodology to break up the application into these components and also define the contract between them, we found the Domain Driven Design philosophy to be the most convincing. At a high level, it guided us on

  • How to break a bigger business domain into smaller bounded contexts(services).
  • How to define contracts between them(services).

These smaller components are the microservices. At a finer level, domain driven design (aka DDD) provides tactical methods to help us with

  • How to write code in a single bounded context(services).
  • How to break up the entities(business objects within the service).
  • How to become eventually consistent(as our data is divided into multiple services we cannot have all of them consistent every moment).

After getting the answer to “how to break the application into microservices,” we needed a framework for writing code on these guidelines. We could come up with a framework of our own, but we chose to not to reinvent the wheel. Lagom , Axon, Eventuate are all java based , frameworks which provides all the functionality that we require to do microservices, like

  1. Writing services using DDD.
  2. Testing services.
  3. Integration with Kafka, Rabbit Mq …, the messaging framework for message passing between services.

This is Part 1 in a series of articles. I have explained how we got our direction on getting started with microservices. In the next article, we will discuss about a sample Application and breakup of that using DDD .

Recommended References

Thanks to the blogs by Vaugh VernonUdi DahanChris Richardson, and Microsoft. A few specific references:

  1. Youtube for Event Sourcing, CQRS, Domain Driven Design, Lagom.
  2. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj554200.aspx
  3. http://cqrs.nu/
  4. Domain Driven Design Distilled and implementing Domain-Driven Design, by Vaugh Vernon.
  5. http://microservices.io/ by Chris Richardson.
  6. Event Storming http://eventstorming.com/, by Alberto.

Find tables on which Postgresql doing Sequential Scan

First let’s understand why we should find out the tables for Sequential Scan. Basically what happens is when we design the schema and create indexes, we want that almost in every case the system should use indexes for getting the data, but later somebody writes a query which dosen’t use indexes and do sequential scan and slows down your system at scale.

To solve this part we should first find out on what tables Postgresql is doing sequential scan. For this postgresql provides stats.

Lets do a query on the stats to find tables for sequential scan:

SELECT schemaname, relname,seq_scan, seq_tup_read,seq_tup_read / seq_scan as avg_seq_tup_read FROM pg_stat_all_tables WHERE seq_scan > 0 ORDER BY 5 DESC LIMIT 5;

schemaname | relname  | seq_scan | seq_tup_read | avg_seq_tup_read 
------------+----------+----------+--------------+------------------
 public     | tickets  |        3 |     24000000 |          8000000
 public     | orders5  |       11 |     50000000 |          4545454
 public     | student  |       18 |      5600010 |           311111
 pg_catalog | pg_class |    89061 |     27452103 |              308
 pg_catalog | pg_index |       35 |         1174 |               33
(5 rows)

The above query tells on which tables sequential scan is done , seq_scan provides the count of sequential scan , seq_tup_read tells the total no. of rows read by the system in all the sequential scan and avg_seq_tup_read tells on average how much rows is read by the query.

Now lets see how to figure out whether this is fine or not:

  • First list all the tables on which sequential scan should not be running – in our case lets take tickets tables
  • Now get the total no. of records in tickets table. – in our case it is – 8000000
  • Now check whether system is scanning the entire table or large portion of the table every time
    • as we can see that avg_seq_tup_read is also 8000000 which means system is scanning entire table every time
  • If the system scanning entire table and you know this table would be huge in future that means some queries on this table are actually not using the index – which is not good
  • check from postgresql logs – the queries on this table which take time (there may be a case you need to enable all query logs for postgresql for some time — generally do not enable this for long , might cause downtime in production , a ok setting would be log any query which is greater than 1 sec)
  • Then check using explain analyze whether this query is doing sequential scan – (if in doubt do not run in production system or run in very low load hours)
  • After you discovered the query try to create indexes – we have a blogs on understanding indexes and why system not using your index , you can check out these if you are unable to figure out.

Why Postgresql Index not working (Bitmap vs Index) ? – Part 2

In last blog series we learned basics of Indexing. In this blog series part 1 we worked on why query is not using the index. Basically sometimes what happens is, when we run a query we thought it should use a particular index but it actually either use diff. index or do not use index at all and do sequential scan. So in this blogs series we will work on how postgresql choose index.

When we ask Postgres to execute a query it is executed in three steps:

  • Parse – to validate the query sytax
  • Planner – to plan how the query is executed like whether to do index scan or sequential scan or bitmap scan
  • Executor – it will finally execute the planned tasks

Here we are more concerned about the Planner part, the entire purpose why the query needs planning is to reduce the total I/O (reading from disks/memory).

In last part we will work on example where Postgres use the index on the order by column and why it does that.

In this part we will work on why Postgres is doing Bitmap Scan rather than Sequential Scan.

First Lets understand a bit about Index Scan and Bitmap Scan:

  • Index Scan
    • Postgres scan the index first and then go to the table and scan the table
    • In this it does random scan of the table row by row
    • It is faster when the index data is sorted in a way which is required by the query.
  • Bitmap Scan
    • Postgres scan the index completely and mark all the pages which contains a matching value rather than checking the rows
    • After completed the index scan (mostly entire index) and have list of all the pages which contains the data
    • It then scan all the tables pages (marked one) and again check the validation conditions in the rows.
    • It is chosen over index when cost of random scan with index is higher.

How we can get a hint whether Index scan is preferred or Bitmap Scan

  • This is based on the correlation between the order in data and its physical representation(in filesystem)
  • Lets understand it by example.
    • First create a table:
      • create table orders as select s as orderno , md5(random()::text) as orderitem , now() as order_created from generate_Series(1,1000000) s;
    • You can we we create a table with a generated series 1-1000000 that is generated sequentially and dumped in the same order as well.
    • Postgresql calculate certain statistics about the column order (increasing or decreasing) with table physical order increasing or decreasing and this data can be see using the following query:
      • First analyze the table : ANALYZE orders;
      • Now run: SELECT attname, correlation FROM pg_stats WHERE tablename = ‘orders1’;
      • you will see correlation for orderno column is 1
      • and this correlation varies from -1 to 1 – desc to asc.
  • When the correlation is high Postgres prefers Index scan but when correlation is less postgresql prefer Bitmap.

Lets create a case where Index Scan will be preferred:

First create table and indexes:


create table orders as select s as orderno  , md5(random()::text) as orderitem , now() as order_created from generate_Series(1,1000000) s;

create index orderno_idx on orders(orderno);

create index order_created_idx on orders(order_created);

Now lets check the correlation value :

SELECT attname, correlation FROM pg_stats WHERE tablename = 'orders';
    attname    | correlation 
---------------+-------------
 orderno       |           1
 orderitem     |  0.00561977
 order_created |           1
(3 rows)

As you can see correlation value is 1 , there is high chance Postgresql will use Index Scan:

Now lets query :

explain analyze select * from orders where orderno < 80000   limit 100 ;
                                                             QUERY PLAN             
                                                
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.42..4.22 rows=100 width=45) (actual time=7.494..7.602 rows=100 loops
=1)
   ->  Index Scan using orderno_idx on orders  (cost=0.42..3028.31 rows=79879 width=
45) (actual time=7.492..7.579 rows=100 loops=1)
         Index Cond: (orderno < 80000)
 Planning time: 0.156 ms
 Execution time: 7.653 ms
(5 rows)

As we can see here the Postgres is using Index Scan.

Lets create a case where Bitmap Scan will be preferred:

First create table and indexes:

create table orders as select random()*10000 as orderno  , md5(random()::text) as orderitem , now() as order_created from generate_Series(1,10000000) s;

create index ord_idx on orders(orderno);

create index order_created_idx on orders(order_created);

Here one important change is rather than using s (generated series) we are generating a random number (random()*10000) such that correlation should be less.

Lets see the coorelation:

analyze orders;

SELECT attname, correlation FROM pg_stats WHERE tablename = 'orders5';
    attname    | correlation 
---------------+-------------
 orderno       |  0.00156549
 orderitem     | 0.000700192
 order_created |           1

Here we can see that the correlation is very less.

Now lets query the table:

explain analyze select * from orders where  orderno >9000;
                                                             QUERY PLAN                                                             
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Bitmap Heap Scan on orders  (cost=19145.75..135021.51 rows=1022621 width=49) (actual time=105.159..1042.678 rows=1002305 loops=1)
   Recheck Cond: (orderno > '9000'::double precision)
   Rows Removed by Index Recheck: 5746548
   Heap Blocks: exact=37001 lossy=66089
   ->  Bitmap Index Scan on ord_idx  (cost=0.00..18890.09 rows=1022621 width=0) (actual time=99.446..99.447 rows=1002305 loops=1)
         Index Cond: (orderno > '9000'::double precision)
 Planning time: 0.158 ms
 Execution time: 1067.465 ms


explain analyze select * from orders where  orderno >0;
                                                       QUERY PLAN                                                       
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Seq Scan on orders5  (cost=0.00..228093.00 rows=10000000 width=49) (actual time=0.032..1013.239 rows=10000000 loops=1)
   Filter: (orderno > '0'::double precision)
 Planning time: 0.282 ms
 Execution time: 1257.460 ms
(4 rows)

Now we can see the system used Bitmap Scan.

Also one more important thing to remember here is that system will sometimes will switch to Sequential Scan also rather than Bitmap Scan when the number of rows selected are very high.

So guys in this tutorial we learned about how Postgres select index primarily Bitmap vs Index.

Why Postgresql Index not working ? – Part 1

In last blog series we learned basics of Indexing. In this blog series we will understand on how to understand why query is not using the index. Basically sometimes what happens is that we assume when we run a query it should use a particular index but it actually either use diff. index or do not use index at all and do sequential scan. So in this blogs series we will work on understanding this case by case.

When we ask Postgres to execute a query it is executed in three steps:

  • Parse – to validate the query sytax
  • Planner – to plan how the query is executed like whether to do index scan or sequential scan or bitmap scan
  • Executor – it will finally execute the planned tasks

Here we are more concerned about the Planner part, the entire purpose why the query needs planning is to reduce the total I/O (reading from disks/memory).

In first part we will work on example where Postgres use diff. index and primarily on the order by column and why it does that.

Lets understand it by example.

First create a table orders with indexes:

create table orders as select s as orderno, md5(random()::text) as orderitem , now() as order_created from generate_Series(1,1000000) s;

create index orderno_idx on orders(orderno);

create index order_created_idx on orders(order_created);

Now you see we have three columns orderno integer , orderitem text , order_created as date and two index one on orderno and other on order_created.

Now lets query :

we will do two query one which contains sorting on order_created and one without it , lets see which index which query use:

explain analyze select * from orders where orderno > 80000  order by order_created desc  limit 100 ;
                                                                     QUERY PLAN                                                                      
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.42..4.54 rows=100 width=45) (actual time=0.016..0.038 rows=100 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan Backward using order_created_idx on orders  (cost=0.42..37829.43 rows=920121 width=45) (actual time=0.015..0.033 rows=100 loops=1)
         Filter: (orderno > 80000)
 Planning time: 0.170 ms
 Execution time: 0.051 ms
(5 rows)



explain analyze select * from orders where orderno < 80000    limit 100 ;
                                                             QUERY PLAN                                                             
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.42..4.22 rows=100 width=45) (actual time=3.121..3.137 rows=100 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using orderno_idx on orders  (cost=0.42..3028.31 rows=79879 width=45) (actual time=3.120..3.130 rows=100 loops=1)
         Index Cond: (orderno < 80000)
 Planning time: 0.052 ms
 Execution time: 3.150 ms
(5 rows)

Lets see the first query – we have put a where clause order > 80000 and order by order created .

  • In this query normal assumption is it should use Btree index created on orderno as it will help on filtering the data fast
  • But actually it is using the Btree index created on order created

Lets understand the reasons for doing so:

  • Query with order clause – Very Important to understand this
    • As we have put the order by clause , in our query there will be around 9 million records matching for order > 80000 (as we have created 10 million record from 1 – 10 million)
    • And postgres thought rather than getting all 9 million record in memory and sorting its better we use the sorted index and check for values > 80000
    • there is a higher chance in this of getting values > 80000 in sorted order
  • Query without order clause
    • as we just needs to check for orderno > 80000 and it is already sorted in orderno index so order no index is used.

In this we understood that when we use order by clause the tendency of postgres is to use index which is there on order by field (as in this case order created).

In next blog we will figure out why postgres in doing bitmap scan rather than index scan.

Understanding Postgresql Indexes For Beginners- Part -6 (Postgresql Stats)

In last blog we learned about partial indexes. In this blog lets see how we can take advantage of Postgresql Stats for optimizing our queries and find out on which tables there are no indexes.

Postgresql provide various statistics about the system and provides us with lots of information on how we can optimize our databases.

In this blog we will discuss on sequential scans on tables and how we should optimize them.

Query to find table with sequential scan:



SELECT
    schemaname, relname,
    seq_scan, seq_tup_read,
    seq_tup_read / seq_scan as avg_seq_tup_read
FROM pg_stat_all_tables
WHERE seq_scan > 0
ORDER BY 5 DESC LIMIT 50;
 schemaname |       relname       | seq_scan | seq_tup_read | avg_seq_tup_read 
------------+---------------------+----------+--------------+------------------
 public     | tickets             |        3 |     24000000 |          8000000
 public     | student             |       18 |      5600010 |           311111
 pg_catalog | pg_class            |    22200 |      6789240 |              305
 pg_catalog | pg_index            |       17 |          503 |               29
 pg_catalog | pg_database         |    10553 |       168788 |               15
 public     | provider            |     1109 |         7763 |                7
 pg_catalog | pg_namespace        |       35 |          208 |                5
 pg_catalog | pg_attribute        |       22 |           96 |                4
 pg_catalog | pg_amproc           |        4 |            8 |                2
 pg_catalog | pg_am               |     6679 |         6679 |                1
 pg_catalog | pg_opclass          |        4 |            4 |                1
 pg_catalog | pg_authid           |        2 |            2 |                1
 pg_toast   | pg_toast_159046     |        1 |            0 |                0
 pg_toast   | pg_toast_159120     |        1 |            0 |                0
 pg_catalog | pg_publication      |     1109 |            0 |                0
 pg_catalog | pg_subscription_rel |        2 |            0 |                0

Now from the above view we can see that on tickets table 3 seq scan ran and row count in our table is also (8000000), which means there are bad queries or bad usage of the system is done as system is sequentially searching on this table.

Now what we should do here is figure out what all queries are which runs on the system via the postgresql and logs and see what index we can create so that this query dosen’t do sequential scan.

Understanding Postgresql Indexes For Beginners- Part -5 (Partial Indexes)

In last blog we learned about Gin indexes. By now we have covered the basic indexes we use in Postgresql.

Now lets look at one of the ways by which we can optimize our indexes for business specific use case.

Partial Indexing

Partial Indexing means that we can create index on some subset of the actual rows of the table.

This type of indexing is very very useful in cases where queries are required on the subset very often.

Lets take a example:

We have a ticketing table(subject text, status varchar) which contains subject of tickets and status whether the ticket is OPEN or CLOSED. Now lets say in our case we primarily search on open tickets only and in general CLOSED Tickets would be increasing constantly.

Lets assume on our ticket table size – 100 million rows , out of which 5 million are OPEN and 95 million are closed.

Now if we create a index on entire table (100 million rows) our index would also be large and every time if we want to search on OPEN ticket only , still we are loading that huge index.

Now with Partial index we can create Gin (text search) only on OPEN ticket rows our index would only work on OPEN Tickets (only 5 million rows), in such case our index would be very small and efficient and fast to load in memory.

How to use

lets create table for tickets only:

create table tickets(subject  tsvector , status varchar);


INSERT INTO tickets ( subject , status) SELECT md5(random()::text)::tsvector,CASE WHEN g < 500000 THEN 'OPEN' ELSE 'CLOSED' END FROM generate_series(1,8000000) as g;

Now lets create a complete index and partial index:

create index t_s_idx on tickets using gin(subject);

Partial Index :

create index t_s_open_idx on tickets using gin(subject) where status='OPEN';

create index t_s_open_idx on tickets using gin(subject) where <CONDITION EXPRESSION>

Size diff. between complete and partial

\di+ t_s_open_idx 
                            List of relations
 Schema |     Name     | Type  |  Owner   |  Table  | Size  | Description 
--------+--------------+-------+----------+---------+-------+-------------
 public | t_s_open_idx | index | postgres | tickets | 40 MB | 
(1 row)

saarthi=# \di+ t_s_idx 
                          List of relations
 Schema |  Name   | Type  |  Owner   |  Table  |  Size  | Description 
--------+---------+-------+----------+---------+--------+-------------
 public | t_s_idx | index | postgres | tickets | 662 MB | 
(1 row)

It is clearly visible that index size is 662 MB vs 40 MB and in general as OPEN tickets will not be constantly increasing this index would be of same size and mostly can remain in memory.

When Partial index would work

Partial Index would work only when the query also contain the search condition which is present while creating the index.

Like in our ticketing case index has condition status =’OPEN’ and if the query also has the condition status=’OPEN’ only then it works.

Most index like Btree, Gin , BRIN can be used as a partial index. Using partial index is one of the most powerful tool to speed up your system.

Understanding Postgresql Indexes For Beginners- Part -4 (Gin)

In the last blog we learned about BRIN index parameters and when to choose it. In this we will learn basic of Gin index.

Gin index is the that can speed up your full text search, lets understand how.

Gin Index

Gin Index – (Generalized Inverted Index) – An inverted index is an index data structure storing a mapping from content, such as words or numbers, to its locations in a document or a set of documents. In simple words, it is a hashmap like data structure that directs you from a word to a document or a web page. If you want more detail reading go to.

Now in case of Postgresql when we create any Gin index on a text column or the type of column is tsvector (A tsvector value is a sorted list of distinct lexemes, which are words that have been normalized to merge different variants of the same word )

Gin does is take all the distinct lexemes and break them into trigrams and map to the rows it points to and it will point to multiple rows if multiple rows contains that lexemes.

Now in this way when we search the any three character in the column and gin index will return the result in fast manner.

Let’s see this in action:

First create a table:

create table student(name  text , address tsvector);

Now let’s add some data:

INSERT INTO student ( name , address) SELECT md5(random()::text), md5(random()::text)::tsvector FROM generate_series(1,800000) as g;

Now lets check for search in name (text) and address (ts_vector fields)

 explain analyze select * from student where name ilike '%puneet%';
                                                        QUERY PLAN                                                         
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Gather  (cost=1000.00..98897.03 rows=1887 width=64) (actual time=316.414..319.296 rows=0 loops=1)
   Workers Planned: 2
   Workers Launched: 2
   ->  Parallel Seq Scan on student  (cost=0.00..97708.33 rows=786 width=64) (actual time=307.882..307.883 rows=0 loops=3)
         Filter: (name ~~* '%puneet%'::text)
         Rows Removed by Filter: 266667
 Planning time: 0.089 ms
 Execution time: 319.353 ms



explain analyze select * from student where address @@ to_tsquery('gurgaon'); 
                                                         QUERY PLAN                                                          
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Gather  (cost=1000.00..154940.76 rows=3956 width=74) (actual time=515.955..518.074 rows=0 loops=1)
   Workers Planned: 2
   Workers Launched: 2
   ->  Parallel Seq Scan on student  (cost=0.00..153545.16 rows=1648 width=74) (actual time=507.235..507.235 rows=0 loops=3)
         Filter: (address @@ to_tsquery('gurgaon'::text))
         Rows Removed by Filter: 266667
 Planning time: 0.125 ms
 Execution time: 518.102 ms
(8 rows)

Now you see its taking 391 ms and 518 ms

Let’s create indexes :

create index a_g_idx on student using gin(address);

CREATE EXTENSION IF NOT EXISTS pg_trgm;

create index name_g_idx on student using gin(name gin_trgm_ops);

Now let’s see the time:

explain analyze select * from student where address @@ to_tsquery('gurgaon'); 
                                                     QUERY PLAN                                                     
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Bitmap Heap Scan on student  (cost=55.25..13838.72 rows=4000 width=74) (actual time=0.067..0.068 rows=0 loops=1)
   Recheck Cond: (address @@ to_tsquery('gurgaon'::text))
   ->  Bitmap Index Scan on a_g_idx  (cost=0.00..54.25 rows=4000 width=0) (actual time=0.063..0.064 rows=0 loops=1)
         Index Cond: (address @@ to_tsquery('gurgaon'::text))
 Planning time: 0.472 ms
 Execution time: 0.140 ms


explain analyze select * from student where name ilike '%puneet%';
                                                     QUERY PLAN                                                      
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Bitmap Heap Scan on student  (cost=60.62..373.33 rows=80 width=74) (actual time=0.032..0.033 rows=0 loops=1)
   Recheck Cond: (name ~~* '%puneet%'::text)
   ->  Bitmap Index Scan on name_g_idx  (cost=0.00..60.60 rows=80 width=0) (actual time=0.029..0.030 rows=0 loops=1)
         Index Cond: (name ~~* '%puneet%'::text)
 Planning time: 6.547 ms
 Execution time: 0.083 ms

you see a huge difference in timings : from 319 ms to 0.14 and 518 to 0.083

Now we have seen the power of Gin Index in Postgresql and what text search in can provide.

Surely there are various parameters to configure and various other use cases of text search that can be done with gin.

Here our purpose was to understand its basics, in future we will work on details also.

In next blog we will work on Partial Indexs. Stay tuned and subscribe our blog for more such blogs.

Understanding Postgresql Indexes for Beginners – Part 4 (BRIN Indexes Optimization)

In last blog we learned about BRIN indexes , in this we will go in little detail on optimizing BRIN indexes and parameters for its optimization.

As we learned that BRIN index basically store the summary information (min and max ) for a particular page range(preferrably adjacent) such that it becomes easy to find which pages to cross check for a particular filter.

In this we will understand the BRIN index update mechanism and optimize the page range parameter.

When BRIN INDEX is updated

  • Index Creation
    • When the index is created it will create summary for all the pages of the table.
  • Table Update
    • For all page which are already summarized if any entry added / updated / removed , the index is updated in the transaction only
    • For new pages which are not summarized
      • Manual Update
        • By default BRIN does not auto update for this one needs to run the function –
          • select brin_summarize_new_values('<index name>'::regclass);
      • Auto Update
        • On autovacuum system will add the summary info for those blocks as well, we need to create index with auto vacuum on like this
          • create index c_t_brin_idx on calllog using brin(call_time) with (pages_per_range = 32,autosummarize = on);

How to optimize BRIN Indexes

Primary parameter to optimize BRIN indexes is the pages_per_range , this balance between no. of pages which needs to be scanned (because of lossy nature) vs no. of index entry created and index maintenance needs.

This parameter needs to be optimized based on individual needs , we will try to provide some guiding rules here, but before that we should do some math here and calculate the number of pages and rows per page:

Calculate no. of pages :

select relpages from pg_class where relname = 'student';;
 relpages 
----------
     5406

Now the number of pages is 5406

Now lets calculate total records :

select count(*) from student;
  count  
---------
 1000000

Now we have total rows as 1 million , lets count no. of record per page:

select 1000000/5406 as row_per_page;
 row_per_page 
--------------
          184

Now we see that row per page is 184 in our case, this will be diff. in you case so before proceeding check in your table.

and default value is 128 in page per range — so minimum values our index need to filter for every query is : 184*128 = 23552

Now lets try to see the rules, also rules needs to be balanced for best performance as in databases everything depends on your needs:

  • Table should be Large – something > 5 millions
    • if less data then benefit of small size of index would be less and Btree would also be small.
  • Data should primarily be INSERT Only
    • If we are constantly updating the data and also the data is updated in such a way that single value occur in multiple page range (eg: page 1-10 raneg is 100 -550 and page 11-20 range is 250-800), in this case the system needs to query both range pages which will slow down the filter as pages increase
  • Data should be inserted in IN ORDER
    • If we are inserting data in such a way that the column in which we are creating index that single value occur in multiple page range (eg: page 1-10 raneg is 100 -550 and page 11-20 range is 250-800), in this case the system needs to query both range pages which will slow down the filter as pages increase
  • Search record are generally in large numbers > 1000
    • if we are selecting single value Btree will generally out perform the BRIN , but if we are selecting the no. of records in some 1000’s , BRIN will start to perform better at large count.

Al in all one needs to be very clear in the above points before deciding to use BRIN.

In next blog we will move to Gin Indexes.

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